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Jon Lambert

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29th April, 2010 at 22:23:40 -

So Overheat is a really powerful Pokémon move that weakens each time you use it right? Anyways, if my computer has an overheat problem, what do I do to remedy it?

 
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29th April, 2010 at 22:36:00 -

I thought you already posting something similar to this...

Like before, make sure it's not squished up against a wall or enclosed with no ventilation. Make sure the fans are running and most of the dust is cleaned out. If you still have a heat problem, it could be a hardware issue or some bad thermal paste.

Heat issues are nasty because there are only so many things you can do.

You're sure it's an overheating issue?

 

  		
  		

GamesterXIII



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30th April, 2010 at 01:09:26 -

What component is overheating?

An overheating processor usually results in a sluggish computer and sometimes results in your computer restarting (most likely) or shutting down (less likely).

An overheating video card will turn itself off. You may still have sound, but will have no signal to the monitor. Sometimes your computer will not turn back on after the video card overheats. Unplug the computer for 10-15 seconds, turn the power supply switch off (if it has one), then plug it back on and turn it on.



 
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30th April, 2010 at 01:47:32 -

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DUST, COULD BE DUST

 
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Jon Lambert

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30th April, 2010 at 01:48:42 -


Originally Posted by GamesterXIII
An overheating processor usually results in a sluggish computer

This. This is what happens (and eventually it freezes up) so I would like to know how to stop it.

Also, I forgot to mention that it likes to do checks for disk consistency often. Sometimes these end up with blue screens and most of the time it will spend 10 or 20 minutes at 51 percent on stage two.

 
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30th April, 2010 at 02:32:19 -

Check for dust on the processor heatsink like Ricky said.

Check for bad capacitors on your motherboard (they should be flat on top, not bulging AT ALL) They can cause all sorts of problems including a sluggish computer, corrupt files (frequent disk checks!), freezing, restarting, shutting down, etc.

Do you get disk check a lot because the computer freezes and you have to power it down manually rather than doing a soft shut down? Thats fine. Your HD could be going out if it is older. Put your ear up to it and see if it makes any weird scratching or ringing noises - you may have to take the side of the case off to listen. If it does, I would recommend getting a new one to prevent sudden loss of data in the future.

Are you positive you don't have excessive amounts of software running in the background? Make sure updates aren't running. If you use an antivirus I would recommend avira over anything from the store (though I hear kaspersky is good) as it runs much fewer processes in the background.

Try doing a manual disk check (go to start > run > type "cmd" and press enter. In the prompt type chkdsk c: /r) let it run and finish on its own.



 
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30th April, 2010 at 08:33:32 -

Lol, don't play with your capacitors! They should work perfectly fine over 99.9% of the time, and the only times they're "bad" is if you're touching them!

Yeah, modern processors (CPU and GPU) slow down when overheating. It would make a hard shut down when it reaches critical level. You never want it to hard shut down, but it doesn't seem like that's a problem to you now. Overheating would make it slow down. Freezing is not that likely from a software level, but from a hardware level, electronics are often designed to function in room temperature or lower. They like mess up when they're too hot.

Also like Gamester said, it could be a hard disk thing. Hard disks won't necessarily make weird noises when they're malfunctioning, unless it's so badly damaged that the disk has to scan many times to find it. Normally if it's bad, the device controller/driver/OS would try to weed out the bad sectors and save the data aside, so you shouldn't have to worry about it.

What O/S are you using?

 
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GamesterXIII



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1st May, 2010 at 23:09:45 -


Originally Posted by Muz
Lol, don't play with your capacitors! They should work perfectly fine over 99.9% of the time, and the only times they're "bad" is if you're touching them!

Yeah, modern processors (CPU and GPU) slow down when overheating. It would make a hard shut down when it reaches critical level. You never want it to hard shut down, but it doesn't seem like that's a problem to you now. Overheating would make it slow down. Freezing is not that likely from a software level, but from a hardware level, electronics are often designed to function in room temperature or lower. They like mess up when they're too hot.

Also like Gamester said, it could be a hard disk thing. Hard disks won't necessarily make weird noises when they're malfunctioning, unless it's so badly damaged that the disk has to scan many times to find it. Normally if it's bad, the device controller/driver/OS would try to weed out the bad sectors and save the data aside, so you shouldn't have to worry about it.

What O/S are you using?



Uh. You're pretty much uninformatively rehashing my post. I repair computers for a living and capacitors go out on motherboards all the time. I have seen it countless times on computers that have never been opened and it has happened to me multiple times as well. Touching a capacitor should have no effect on it unless you shock it and even then it will probably be fine afterwards.

I guess people who buy flat screen TVs that end up with bad capacitors have been fiddling with the innards of their televisions since the day they bought them huh? Serves them right.

All processors, not just modern ones, slow down when they are hot. A hard shutdown isn't even that big of a deal as it is a preventative measure and most likely will not damage any components. Older processors (mainly AMD processors) did not have this protection, thus they would just burn up rather than shutting down. Freezing from software related problems is just as common, if not more common than freezing due to hardware-related issues.

Most hard drives DO make noise when they are malfunctioning as malfunctions are caused by actual physical damage to the drive/disc itself. If a disk has to scan a bunch it is most likely from fragmented files, not damage to the drive. The noises a malfunctioning drive makes are much different.

 
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Sketchy

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2nd May, 2010 at 00:21:55 -

Overheating still seems like the most likely cause to me.

You could start by downloading a CPU temperature monitor utility, such as this:
http://www.freedownloadscenter.com/Utilities/System_Maintenance_and_Repair_Utilities/CPU_Thermometer.html
(your GFX card driver software may have a similar tool)

You could also try opening up the computer case, and using your computer like that. If it runs better without the casing, then that would also suggest something is overheating.

Meanwhile, if I were you, I'd be backing up all my important files, just in case the HDD is about to pack up...

 
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Jon Lambert

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8th May, 2010 at 01:55:25 -

One time my compuuter did this to the mouse cursor:
Image

Anyways, the inside looks like this, if it helps:
Image
Image

I downloaded one of those monitor programs once and it stated a temperature of around 50-60 degrees Celsius, so...

 
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8th May, 2010 at 02:48:12 -

50-60 degrees is a little high, but it should be alright - most CPUs have a stated maximum temperature of around 70 degrees.

That, and the weird cursor, suggest maybe it's a problem with the graphics card (which would also cause frequent shut-downs).
Can you check it's temperature from the graphics driver software?

If you have a separate graphics card (it looks like you probably don't), then you could take it out, and use the on-board graphics instead, and see if that helps.
Otherwise, try and get hold of a spare graphics card and try that (even a dirt cheap second hand one off ebay).

 
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Jon Lambert

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9th May, 2010 at 01:45:19 -

Other parts of the inside look like this:
Image
Image
The graphics card is an NVIDIA GeForce 6100 nForce 405, which does not tell me the temperature itself. The other software I used expired and this CUP Thermometer does not tell me the temperature, just the frequency, which is 77.3 mHz * 13 = 1004.6 mHz

 
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Sketchy

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9th May, 2010 at 02:38:25 -

Do you have nTune installed?
If not, you can get it here:
http://www.nvidia.co.uk/object/ntune_5.05.47.00_uk.html
It should be able to monitor the temperature of your on-board graphics, and possibly allow you to under-clock it to prevent overheating.

For starters, I would remove that square, black metal plate on the back of the case - either leave it open, or fit an extra fan there.
I presume the on-board graphics are under that square heatsink, so you could always try adding a small fan on top of that too.

Otherwise, you could do what I said before, and install a PCI graphics card, which would then bypass the on-board graphics altogether.


 
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