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GamesterXIII



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28th September, 2009 at 00:22:47 -

I love shootemups . . .especially bullet hell.

Recently, Cave (progear, dodonpachi, espgaluda, guwange, etc.) announced that their next console port would be region free. That port being Mushihime Sama Futari 1.5. It will include 1.0 (i believe), 1.5, and black label.

I did 27 backflips when I heard this information being rumored . . .it has been announced in the last day or so at TGS 2009.

Despite how hard it may look, mushihime has at LEAST 3 difficulties so if you love shmups, you should import it if you can. The difficulty levels range from original (like your typical shmup game), maniac - which is a loot harder than your typical shmup game, but isn't thaaaaat hard, and ultra which is absolutely ridiculous, but possible as well. Don't be scared of the game as it is extremely satisfying to play and beautiful at the same time.

I believe the release date is november 11th - I'm too lazy and excited to check though =p.

Heres the preview.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LG0pyFWlqxw

Cave Shooters are known for having some of, if not the hardest end bosses of all time.

IIRC only a few people in the world have beaten the final boss on Mushihime Sama 1 without using a continue.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PP-mePr1-ZQ

theres a sample.



 
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nim



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28th September, 2009 at 08:04:51 -

I've never heard of any of those games you mentioned, so I guess I'm not as big a fan of shmups as I thought I was. Axelay is one of my favourite games, so I love shmups, but that's in a wholly different sub-genre. I find it more enjoyable to watch someone else play bullet hell shmups (in other words, I stink at playing them myself.) I can't view the Youtube videos right now but I'd imagine it looks like bolognaise sliding down a window.

 
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GamesterXIII



Registered
  04/12/2008
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I am an April Fool
28th September, 2009 at 09:40:07 -

many cave shooters are obtainable through the usual method *cough*

you should try
giga wing (not cave but a GREAT shmup and it has a bullet reflect move that should help you get the hang of things)
guwange
esp ra de
dodonpachi - not dodonpachi 2
Dangun Feveron
Progear
Espgaluda
19xx the war against destiny (not cave, but great as well)
Mars Matrix (not cave). I don't prefer this one over the others, but a lot of people seem to love it.

Espgaluda or Esp Ra de may not be obtainable . . .can't remember which - if one is unplayable using the typical method .

 
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Pixelthief

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28th September, 2009 at 16:56:24 -

I personally enjoy shmup's, but loathe the japanese bullet hell genre. I'm a game designer not an artist, and I really dislike how those games value the artistry over the gameplay. As something to watch, its fine, but as something to play I simply couldn't be bothered. I mean, as you approach the event horizon of the entire screen being blacked out by shiny particles, the games tend to boil away from "shoot aliens" and boil down to "navigate a very very tiny maze"

I can see how some people like it, but not my cup 'o tea

 
Gridquest V2.00 is out!!
http://www.create-games.com/download.asp?id=7456

GamesterXIII



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28th September, 2009 at 17:37:13 -

Most shmups are way too easy for the most part (or have a stupid difficulty curve such as making bullets move 100x your speed - see pyikyo shooters) and bullet hell shooters aren't really "artistically based". How is being a game designer NOT being an artist by the way? Art is a very broad term and can be applied to anything. "A person who is skilled at some activity"

Mushihime has 3 modes of play which are original - which is like most shmups, maniac - which is a lot harder and tons of fun, but not as difficult as it looks, and ultra, which is the crazy one which requires real hardcore skill to play. I was almost 1ccing the first mushihime on maniac the first time or two I played it after having not played a shmup since who knows how many years ago - so its not as tasking as it may seem. It doesn't all boil down to just "navigating a maze of bullets". . . theres more technique and skill to it than you may think.

Like I said If you enjoy shmups you should definitely give it a shot. The difficulty system is fine tunable (past the 3 available difficulties) if you have trouble with it. You should always give a game a try before judging it.

 
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Pixelthief

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29th September, 2009 at 02:04:02 -

No I don't think that games aren't art, quite the opposite. Rather, think of it like I do; a video game programmer as a writer, and his work parallel to novels. To this end, I've always found the bullet hell games more like Where's Waldo. See, I think the bullet hell genre, specifically in japan, caters to this idea of artistry over gameplay- they try to make the game look impressive and artsy, but at the expense of gameplay in general. A game like Perfect Cherry Blossom, while excellent to behold, really isn't terribly much more than navigating a predetermined 'maze' of bullets with a tiny tiny collision box. I think at issue is the interactivity. I find art in the development of elegant code; the AI behind say the black ops in half-life had a different order of magnitude in design than a spaceship that shoots bullets in a circle, yet not that visual appeal. A game like Super Mario Galaxy has its awe in the well crafted mechanics and engine, not as a graphics-pusher. But a lot of the bullet hell genre devolves into no interaction at all with the game; you are merely tracing a predetermined path, and where other games might have strategy, hand-eye coordination, reaction times all to the test, in these its more just a matter of memorization.

But don't get me wrong, I think that genre has plenty of merit to it. Just, along the lines of the "programming as writing" parallel, I find the bullet hells more akin to painting. What of the equivalent of a Doctor Seuss book with imaginative illustrations- it is not a novel like War and Peace, but it is as much art. Its just the idea of lumping it into the same category which is a little off. Just like how a bullet hell game is better judged as an "interactive painting" than a game. But hey, as a painting, some of those games would make it on their own

 
Gridquest V2.00 is out!!
http://www.create-games.com/download.asp?id=7456

GamesterXIII



Registered
  04/12/2008
Points
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I am an April Fool
29th September, 2009 at 03:13:06 -


Originally Posted by Pixelthief
No I don't think that games aren't art, quite the opposite. Rather, think of it like I do; a video game programmer as a writer, and his work parallel to novels. To this end, I've always found the bullet hell games more like Where's Waldo. See, I think the bullet hell genre, specifically in japan, caters to this idea of artistry over gameplay- they try to make the game look impressive and artsy, but at the expense of gameplay in general. A game like Perfect Cherry Blossom, while excellent to behold, really isn't terribly much more than navigating a predetermined 'maze' of bullets with a tiny tiny collision box. I think at issue is the interactivity. I find art in the development of elegant code; the AI behind say the black ops in half-life had a different order of magnitude in design than a spaceship that shoots bullets in a circle, yet not that visual appeal. A game like Super Mario Galaxy has its awe in the well crafted mechanics and engine, not as a graphics-pusher. But a lot of the bullet hell genre devolves into no interaction at all with the game; you are merely tracing a predetermined path, and where other games might have strategy, hand-eye coordination, reaction times all to the test, in these its more just a matter of memorization.

But don't get me wrong, I think that genre has plenty of merit to it. Just, along the lines of the "programming as writing" parallel, I find the bullet hells more akin to painting. What of the equivalent of a Doctor Seuss book with imaginative illustrations- it is not a novel like War and Peace, but it is as much art. Its just the idea of lumping it into the same category which is a little off. Just like how a bullet hell game is better judged as an "interactive painting" than a game. But hey, as a painting, some of those games would make it on their own



Well put, but they are not typically "predetermined mazes". Believe it or not, Bullet hell games require strategy, lots of eye hand coordination, and reaction times and a bit of memorization (like any other game). Chaining levels in bullet hell games with combo systems takes a hell of a lot of skill to be quite honest and is completely different from just trying to clear the game with minimal deaths. Saying it is purely memorization is like people saying that others are only good at games like DDR because they memorize the songs, when 99.99999% of players don't memorize anything. Many of the boss patterns in bullet hell games are thrown at you at different times, not in a routine order. How can you possibly memorize a series of patterns that are in a random order? Patterns are also never the same because many of them are based on your location, and dodging from each and every angle is almost like a different skill withing itself. The way you play also affects how difficult the next 5-30 seconds may be.

Go look up original mode videos already, dammit ;p.

Edited by GamesterXIII

 
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